Best State Seal


Maybe it's because I loved grade school civics class, but I've always liked my native state's seal. Presumably, the ship is the Ranger, John Paul Jones' war machine that was built in Portsmouth in 1777. He sailed it right off the ways to France where he harassed the Brits for a couple of years before capturing the Bon Homme Richard in a famous sea battle.

I wonder if they still teach that kind of stuff in grade school, or if it's now all multi-culti history about lesbian and transgender settlers who suffered through years of white male dominance. I'd bet on the latter.

5 comments:

Terry

7:03 AM

What do you think of the Granite State's insistence on putting political slogans on the license plates it issues?

I happen to believe in the words "Live Free Or Die," but while living in NH for a year in the 80s I scratched them off my plates out of principle. I was quickly ticketed by a bored trooper in West Lebanon.

I considered going to the NH Civil Liberties Union and get it turned it into a landmark case, but was about to move to Connecticut in a month and so dropped the idea.

Jake

9:33 AM

You say political slogan, I say historically significant and patriotic words. You say potato and I say potahto. Perhaps, you say "In God We Trust" on the money is a dangerous mixture of church and state. And perhaps I say that the Constitution is based on the basic tenets of Christianity and we should celebrate the unifying force that the words represent.

The answer is that since I agree with "Live Free or Die" and don't see them as inherently political, I actually would like it on my license plate. So there we go.

Re the NHCLU, if only they chose their cases based solely on protecting civil liberties. But that organization's agenda is more focused on "progressive" politics, so I wouldn't want to get involved with them in any way that had me on the same side of the court room.

Terry

12:16 PM

I've always considered "In God We Trust" and "One nation under God" to be harmless blandishments.

If you are reciting the pledge in a public place, you can always remain silent or just not say the words "One nation ...". As for "In God ...," our money leaves its wallet almost as quickly as it goes in.

But putting those types of words on every car in the state and making it mandatory crosses a line. It implies an endorsement of those principles. So that's why I object ...

Terry #2

2:59 PM

Ah, another opportunity to promote my idea of putting: Live Well Or Die on the Connecticut license plates.

Jake

3:48 PM

Which reminds me of what the Philadelphia Episcopalians said about the Philadelphia Quakers... "They came to do good, and did very well indeed".